Leagues NTRP FAQs

The USTA uses the National Tennis Rating Program (NTRP) for determining levels of competition for USTA Leagues. Get answers to frequently asked questions below.

General NTRP

What is NTRP?

National Tennis Rating Program is a classification system developed in 1978 that identifies and describes
the general characteristics of thirteen levels of tennis-playing ability.

What are the NTRP Rating Levels & Ranges?

We do not publish or disclose ratings in tenths or hundreths

NTRP Levels

2.50 & Below = 2.5
2.51 – 3.00 = 3.0
3.01 – 3.50 = 3.5
3.51 – 4.00 = 4.0
4.01 – 4.50 = 4.5
4.51 – 5.00 = 5.0
5.01 – 5.50 = 5.5

The NTRP system identifies general levels of ability, but an individual will be rated within those levels at 50 different hundredths of a point.

For example, a 3.5 player can fall anywhere between a 3.01 and a 3.50. That is the reason many people feel they are playing sandbaggers – they are closer to the bottom of that range while their opponents are closer to the top of the range. A typical match result for a player, for example, with a 3.01 rating versus a 3.49 player, both of whom are 3.5s, would be 6-0, 6-0 in favor of the higher rated player.

What do the letters mean after an NTRP Rating?

Each NTRP Level is followed by a letter indicating the type of rating.

  • C = Computer Rated Players
  • M = Mixed Exclusive Players
  • T = Tournament Players
  • = Appealed – all granted appeals including Medical and Promoted Players 60 or over
  • S = Self-rated players
  • D = Dynamic or NTRP Grievance Disqualified Players

Are all players in a given NTRP level equal in ability?

No. The NTRP system identifies general levels of ability, but an individual will be rated within those levels at 50 different hundredths of a point. For example, a 3.5 player can fall anywhere between a 3.01 and a 3.50.  That is the reason many people feel they are playing sandbaggers – they are closer to the bottom of that range while their opponents are closer to the top of the range. A typical match result for a player, for example, with a 3.01 rating versus a 3.49 player, both of whom are 3.5s, would be 6-0, 6-0 in favor of the higher rated player.

What are valid Computer Ratings

Players who are 59 years or under during the current League Year will have their most current computer rating displayed in TennisLink. They must self-rate if their NTRP rating is older than 3 years.

*Exception: A player who receives a published M rating type and chooses to participate in the Adult  Division will be required to self-rate even if the M rating is less than 3 years old.  

Players who will be 60 years or older during the current League Year will have their most current computer rating displayed in TennisLink. They must self-rate if their NTRP rating is older than 2 years.

*Exception: A player who receives a published M rating type and chooses to participate in the Adult Division will be required to self-rate even if the M rating is less than 2 years old. 

TennisLink will automatically remove expired computer and self-ratings thereby allowing individuals to self-rate. Players with expired ratings will not be allowed to self-rate at a lower level than their last valid NTRP rating. However, they will have the opportunity to file a self-rate appeal of the rating assigned.

Computer ratings are valid based on the above table.

Self-ratings are valid for 2 years from the date issued or until replaced by a dynamic or computer rating.

What is a year-end rating?

A year-end rating is a NTRP level assigned at conclusion of the league championship year that reflects level of ability. A player’s year-end rating shall be used to enter leagues during the following year and will be valid for up to three years or until another rating is generated.

Who is the awesome web person providing these FAQs online?

Well that’s a silly question isn’t it?  Everyone knows that’s Brad.  He is not only awesome, he is like way super cool too.

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Self-Rating

What is a self-rating?

A self-rating is an entry rating level determined by the new player based on questions asked in the
TennisLink registration process. All players must enter league tennis with a valid computer rating or self rate using TennisLink.

Click Here To Self-Rate

When and how do I get a self-rating?

If you do not have a computer rating you must self-rate before entering a USTA League program. Go directly to TennisLink and log in with your your email address and password. You will need your team number, and a major credit card. Click on “Register for a Team” and follow the prompts which will lead you through the registration and self-rate process.

Click Here To Self-Rate

Can I declare a different self-rating for different League Divisions (e.g., 3.5 for Adult 18 & Over and 4.0 for 40 and Over)?

No. Once you declare an initial self-rating, you are bound by it for one year or until you generate a computer rating. So if you plan to play 4.0 Adult 40 & Over but also want to play 3.5 Adult 18 & Over later in the year – be certain that you select 3.5 as an option.

What if I have self-rated and played four matches in the Adult 18 & Over and then sign up for the Adult 40 & Over. Will I use my self-rating or will the system generate a computer rating for me?

The system will have a Dynamic NTRP number on you from your Adult 18 & Over play. However, you will continue with the self-rating you selected until the year-end computer ratings are published; unless of course, you are disqualified and you then must immediately move up.

What if I think a self-rated player has not rated himself or herself accurately?

On any given day, a player may play above or below his or her rating. If you truly feel a self-rated player is significantly above level, you may file an NTRP grievance. Contact your local league coordinator.

Click Here To Self-Rate

Dynamic Ratings

What is a dynamic rating?

A dynamic rating is the result of your current match averaged with up to three of your most recent dynamic results generated. A dynamic rating is calculated after each match. A dynamic rating may change with each match played.

When are dynamic ratings calculated?

Dynamic ratings for local play are calculated nightly for the Adult 18 & Over, 40 & Over and 55 & Over League Types. During championships, dynamic ratings are run instantly as match results are entered.

Is there a difference between a dynamic rating and a year-end rating?

Yes, there are several.

  • Dynamic ratings are not disclosed to players, where year-end ratings are published annually at NTRP levels.
  • Dynamic ratings are expressed to the one-hundredth of a point, where year-end ratings are expressed only to the one-half point.
  • Dynamic ratings are calculated regularly and based on an average of the current match plus the previous three dynamic ratings, whereas year-end ratings are based on a combination of one’s cumulative dynamic rating during the season.

Can my rating level change during the championship year?

Yes.

  • If you receive the 3rd strike and are dynamically disqualified at your present level.
  • If a Self-Rate Eligibility Grievance is upheld, this may also result in raising your level.

If my rating changes with every match played, can I see it?

No. Ratings are only published at year end.

Do USTA NTRP sanctioned tournaments count in the dynamic rating system?

No, USTA Florida does not include tournament results for year-end calculations.

Mixed Leagues

How does a mixed exclusive player get a rating?

The last dynamic rating generated with a minimum of three matches calculated in Mixed Exclusive is the year-end rating that will be used as the NTRP start level for the next year.

Can I use my mixed exclusive rating to play in other divisions?

A Mixed Exclusive player must self-rate in order to join the Adult 18 & Over, 40 & Over, and 55 & Over. Mixed exclusive is a minimum NTRP start level only. A mixed exclusive rating is not supported by any NTRP calculation data and is subject to NTRP grievance.

Does the dynamic calculation apply to Mixed League play?

Yes, for players who participate exclusively in the Mixed Division. Mixed 18 & Over and 40 & Over results will not be part of generating a player’s year-end rating except for those players who play exclusively mixed doubles.

Disqualifications

Why would I be dynamically disqualified?

When a player receives three strikes, they will be notified that they have been dynamically disqualified. This happens because you, your captain, or your tennis professional indicated an NTRP level much too low for your ability on your self-rating.

Can I be disqualified if I have a valid computer rating?

No, however players who’s year end ratings have been reduced through appeal actions, players who have Mixed Exclusive ratings, players who have tournament produced ratings, or players with published dynamic ratings in early-start leagues are subject to dynamic disqualification.

What are the consequences of disqualification?

In all cases, the player is disqualified from participation at that NTRP level:

  • During local league: In all cases, the player is disqualified from participation at that NTRP level and matches played will be reversed for the local season.
  • During Championships: Throughout Championship play: The Florida section elects to run calculations throughout the championship event. The player will be disqualified from participation at that NTRP level for the balance of the year and the succeeding year.
    • Round Robin format: Throughout the championship, any player reaching the DQ criteria will have all matches at that NTRP level reversed to 0-6, 0-6.
    • Single Elimination format: Throughout the championship, the last match played by the player at that NTRP level will be reversed to 0-6, 0-6.

Who cannot be NTRP dynamically disqualified?

NTRP Levels followed by the letter below:

  • C = Computer Rated Players (except in the exceptions noted below)
  • M = Mixed Exclusive Players **
  • T = Tournament Players **

** Exception: Year-end (M) and (T) rated players are required to self-rate to enter the Adult Division, automatically become (S) rated players and therefore become subject to NTRP dynamic disqualification

Who can be dynamically disqualified?

NTRP Levels followed by the letter below:

  • = Appealed – all granted appeals including Medical and Promoted Players 60 or over
  • S = Self-rated players
  • D = Dynamic or NTRP Grievance Disqualified Players
  • C = Computer Rated Players (in the case of the expection for year-end (M) and (T) rated players who are required to self-rate to enter the Adult Division and automatically become (S) rated players and therefore become subject to NTRP dynamic disqualification)

Who is notified in the event of a disqualification? By whom? How quickly?

Responsibility for monitoring dynamic ratings lies with the Section League Coordinator. When a “third strike” situation arises, the SLC will notify by e-mail, using the e-mail address as reported on TennisLink:

  • the player’s Team Captain
  • the affected player and
  • the relevant Local League Coordinator

Notification is made as soon as possible once a third strike has been received.

What is a strike and how do I get one?

Each time a player’s dynamic rating exceeds the maximum tolerance for the level, he or she automatically earns a “strike.”

Will I be notified if I earn a “strike”?

No. Notice occurs only after 3 strikes are accumulated. Many players receive 1 or 2 strikes & never get the 3rd. To needlessly worry or prevent a player from participating based on the possibility of getting a strike is not fair to the player or the team.

How high can my dynamic rating go before I earn a “strike”?

The Dynamic NTRP system allows a certain tolerance for player improvement. The specific improvement factor is not published because of concerns that individuals, captains or others may attempt to manipulate their ratings.

Will I be told exactly which matches earned me “three strikes”?

Yes, if you ask, a copy of your matches can be provided but these are already visible on TennisLink.

If I am NTRP disqualified during the Adult 18 & Over Local league, what happens to my matches in other Divisions?

If a local NTRP disqualification occurs during concurrent Adult 18 & Over, Adult 40 & Over and/or Adult 55 &  Over local league seasons, the disqualifications shall affect the matches played by the disqualified player in all Divisions. If the seasons are not concurrent or over-lapping, the NTRP disqualification shall affect the matches played by the disqualified player in the season in which the NTRP DQ occurred.

The Section determines the penalties to be imposed for NTRP disqualifications.

The rules state that NTRP disqualification is not part of the Mixed Division. If I am disqualified at the Adult 18 & Over, 40 & Over or 55 & Over, am I allowed to participate at the disqualified level in Mixed Division for the remainder of the league year?

No. Even though the Mixed Division does not allow disqualification, it must follow the rules in relation to playing at the correct level. A player who has been moved up as a result of a disqualification in the Adult Divisions must immediately adjust his/her NTRP level of play in the Mixed Division. The player will have two options:

  • If a combined NTRP level team, he/she may continue on that team by adjusting the Levels. (9.0 combined team – DQ’d 4.5 player now at 5.0 must play with no greater than a 4.0 player)
  • If a single NTRP level team, he/she must move up to the appropriate NTRP level or sit out the balance of that season depending on the section’s regulations. (A player on a combined NTRP level team may also choose to move up if the section allows.) In the Mixed Doubles Division, all matches played up until the notification of the disqualification will be counted. Any match played at the disqualified level following notification of the disqualification will be counted as defaults for the individual team match of the disqualified player and 6-0, 6-0 wins for the opponents in those individual matches.